Dating coptic crosses

The Celtic cross is a form of Christian cross featuring a nimbus or ring that emerged in Ireland and Britain in the Early Middle Ages.A type of ringed cross, it became widespread through its use in the stone high crosses erected across the islands, especially in regions evangelized by Irish missionaries, from the 9th through the 12th centuries.Other interpretations claim that placing the cross on top of the circle represents Christ's supremacy over the pagan sun.The Celtic Revival of the mid-19th century led to an increased use and creation of Celtic crosses in Ireland.Although there were doubts on the constitutionality of the ban, it was upheld in a decision of the supreme court.

It is not clear where the first high crosses originated. Johns Cross at Iona was the first high cross; Iona's influence as a center of pilgrimage may have led this cross to inspire the Ahenny group as well as other ringed crosses in Pictish stones.Irish examples with a head in cross form include the Cross of Kells, Ardboe High Cross, the crosses at Monasterboice, the Cross of the Scriptures, Clonmacnoise and those in Scotland at Iona and the Kildalton Cross, which may be the earliest to survive in good condition.Surviving, free-standing crosses are in Cornwall, including St Piran's cross at Perranporth, and Wales.The Celtic cross now appears in various retail items.Both the Gaelic Athletic Association and the Northern Ireland national football team have used versions of the Celtic cross in their logos and advertising.

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