Dating antique ball jars

Plus, there is a sub-minutia of variances in the entire differing genre of Ball jars, to make matters even more convoluted.

Now, who hasn’t at one time or another, whether at a garage sale, antique store, grandma’s basement or in some hole-in-the-wall come across a Ball jar, whether a PERFECT MASON, IDEAL, SURE SEAL, IMPROVED, SPECIAL or one of the myriad of other varieties of jars produced over the last century plus by the Ball Glass Mfg Co.

But, what I have truly gained over the years besides the wonderful jars in my collection is something far more intrinsically valuable, namely the many great people who befriended me, taught me, reasoned, bantered with me, traded with me, sold jars to me, and shared their lives. I can honestly say that collecting Ball jars has been one of the most satisfying adventures in my life and something I will never regret doing as long as I live.

GLASS FACTORY INFO ~ Dating ~ Antique Bottles ~ Fruit Jars ~ Glass Electrical Insulators ~ Tableware ~ Articles about different kinds of Glassware ~ Manufacturers' Marks used by Glass Companies in the United States: It has come to my attention that some oddly colored Nov 30th 1858-type jars (shades of red and yellow, probably other colors exist) have recently surfaced for sale on auction sites. We can be assured that ALL jars with this mold number are reproductions (modern fakes or ‘fantasy’ jars). If anyone has further info on this type of jar, or knows of other mold numbers that ID fakes, please contact me! Also…….of August 4, 2014, unusually colored midget (Consolidated Fruit Jar Company logo) NOV 30TH 1858 jars have been reported with a mold number on the base: H39s (the “9” is backwards and the “S” looks somewhat like a backward “Z”). John Landis Mason was awarded patent #22186, issued on November 30, 1858 by the U. Patent & Trademark Office (actually the patent was termed an “Improvement in screw-neck bottles”), for his invention concerning the process of creating a threaded screw-type closure on bottles and jars.

The very first jars with the Nov 30 1858 patent date embossing are to have been made at the “Crowleytown” Glass Works (more accurately the Atlantic Glass Works), located in Washington Township, New Jersey. The “Crowleytown” jars have a more pronounced square shoulder, differing in appearance from the typical later types.

For a very good in-depth discussion of the Crowleytown and nearby glass works, check out .

The “whittled” look might be compared to the appearance of heavy rain beating against a glass windowpane, and is caused by the molten glass having been blown into a mold that was not properly pre-heated — that is, the glass had begun to solidify too quickly. The jar pictured here is an example.) Mason’s Patent Nov 30th 1858 jar " data-medium-file="https://i2com/ fit=520,1024&ssl=1" class="wp-image-1083 size-medium jetpack-lazy-image" title="Mason's Patent Nov 30th 1858 jar, marked W C D on the base. resize=152,300&ssl=1" alt="Mason's Patent Nov 30th 1858 jar" width="152" height="300" data-recalc-dims="1" data-lazy-srcset="https://i2com/ resize=152,300&is-pending-load=1#038;ssl=1" srcset="data:image/gif;base64, R0l GODlh AQABAIAAAAAAAP///y H5BAEAAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAIBRAA7" However, vast quantities were produced by well over 100 different glass factories, and many of those have NO identification marks whatsover, or only a mold number, letter, or emblem on the base.

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Historical figures show that from between Sept 1, 1894 until Dec 31, 1961, 41,256,856 Gross jars were produced by the Ball Glass Mfg Co.The phrase was soon considered an important marketing device, adding to the perception of quality and reliability of the container to the average consumer, and, at least by 1879 (21 years after the patent was issued), it is very likely that nearly every glass bottle factory was producing their own version.The 1880s and 1890s likely saw the peak of popularity of these jars.Another firm which was producing the jars early on was the Consolidated Fruit Jar Company, perhaps making them as early as 1859 or 1860.Questions remain on exactly which companies made these jars during the early years, since the 1858 patent evidently lasted 13 years (or 20 years, counting a patent reissue), and ostensibly during that time period no one was allowed to produce the jars because of patent infringement issues unless they were granted permission by Mason, or the licensed holder of the patent.

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